Thursday, 20 March 2014

Out like a lion?

Well, March came in like a lamb so, traditionally, it should go our like a lion.   If this is true then all I can say is I sincerely hope that the 'lion' has not arrived already - it is only the 20th, so eleven more days to go.   But today is awful.  The temperature has dropped by ten degrees, the wind has strengthened to strong gale force, the rain is now coming down hard and the day is altogether in deteriorating mode.

The farmer and I have just been for our six-weekly 'tweak' at the Physiotherapist.   The farmer goes for manipulation on his farmer's shoulders (carrying heavy bales of straw all his life) and his farmer's knees (jumping down out of his tractor cab instead of using the steps).   I go for manipulation of what my Physiotherapist calls 'Teachers' Back) - this involves twisting my body in two different directions - a manoeuvre I hate but which does make my back feel decidedly more comfortable.  She also works on my ankle and my arthritic knee to disperse some of the fluid.   Oh the joys of getting old.

It is also my day for the hairdresser.   I crossed the Market Place to go into the Newsagents to pay the newspaper bill, but the wind had other ideas.  Somehow the Market Place really funnels the wind - it certainly did so today, sweeping me almost off my feet and blowing me a hundred yards down the car park.   I was just in the act of falling over when I managed to grab hold of a car door handle and cling on until that gust had passed.

I am now home again, the wood burner is glowing and I have just treated myself to a cup of coffee and a Yorkshire Curd Tart.   If you have never sampled a Curd Tart then do google it and have a go at making them - unless you are lucky enough to live in Yorkshire, in which case every cake shop on the street will sell them.

Interesting how each region seems to have its gourmet speciality, isn't it?  Cornish clotted cream, Eccles cakes, Chorley cakes, Bakewell puddings, Lincolnshire sausages, Welsh cakes  - there must be many more.   Any where you come from?

I see from the news that there is a possibility that some wreckage of the missing aeroplane has been found.   What a mystery that is.  Oddly enough I have been reading a novel about an aeroplane catastrophe - 'The Pilot's Wife' by Anita Shreve.   She is an excellent writer of readable stories - if you haven't tried any of her books, look out for them = they are all published in paperback.

19 comments:

jinxxxygirl said...

I live in California...... not sure what they are known for... i moved here about 2 yrs ago... I will say i had my first crepe when i moved here and it was yummy! Hugs! deb

thelma said...

Do be careful in that wind, I know what Yorkshire winds are like,and the snow, (which we may still have!) when it makes the road from York to Whitby impassable.....

simplesuffolksmallholder said...

Suffolk = rusks - not very exciting. Very windy here too, my hope is that if it's windy it won't be frosty,

Elizabeth said...

Essex not known for its culinary delights - though there were excellent hot doughnuts when I was a child.
Yes, most odd and sad about the lost airliner.

Heather said...

Glad you came to no harm crossing the carpark today. It has been reasonably pleasant down here though very windy at times, especially noticeable on the motorway. It is now pouring with rain.
I remember trying my first Yorkshire Curd Tart years ago on a holiday there - scrumptious. We are quite handy for Welsh cakes - just the other side of the Severn. Maybe Gloucester Old Spot sausages and Double Gloucester cheese count as regional food though they are probably available everywhere now.

angryparsnip said...

Happy to know you didn't fall !
If Tucson is know for any food it would (?) have to be Sonoran food.
Wonderful Mexican food that everyone thinks came from Sonora Mexico but which started here in Tucson.

cheers, parsnip

Pam said...

In Adelaide, although we have regional fine wines and gourmet foods, traditionally it would have to be the pie floater and frog cakes (not together!)
According to Wikipedia 'the pie floater is an Australian dish particularly common in Adelaide and to a lesser degree, Sydney. It commonly consists of a traditional Australian-style meat pie, usually sitting, but sometimes submerged in a bowl of thick green pea soup".
If you are South Australian, particularly generations ago it was a rite of passage to try it.

A thickly iced green Frog cake sits in a patty pan, decorated facial features with a gaping mouth at the top. Part of a trip to town for many a South Australian child was to have a frog cake at Balfour's bakery.

Farmers Union Iced Coffee is also uniquely South Australian and a real favourite - not unusual here to see workmen on their break enjoying a pie with their 'Farmers Union ' iced coffee.

Hildred said...

British Columbia is known for its Nanaimo Bars, - a rich confection of chocolate, custard and icing. Maybe when we get to N in ABC Wednesday I will post the recipe - delicious but full of calories!

I have read The Pilot's Wife and thoroughly enjoyed it

Terry and Linda said...

We don't have anything yummy like that here in our tiny part of the world. I think I need to come to England so I can experience some of your yummy food!

Linda
http://coloradofarmlife.wordpress.com

Cloudia said...

Malasadas are Portuguese "donuts" that Hawaii is CRAZY for, and Haupia
deserves a Google :)

ALOHA from Honolulu
Comfort Spiral

=^..^= <3



Cro Magnon said...

Sussex Pond. Not everyone's cup of tea, but it's the only one I can think of.

Rachel said...

Norfolk dumplings served with skirt and kidney stew. Lovely.

ChrisJ said...

Oooh! Curd tarts! I love them. It's years since I had any.

ChrisJ said...

Oooh! Curd tarts! I love them. It's years since I had any.

Gwil W said...

The wreckage, if it is the wreckage, after many days could be a long way from the black box.

Yesterday I refused a Wiener Schnitzel. I had some cold aubergine and warm tomato. No name for it.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Completely forgot Dundee Cake - didn't know about Suffolk rusks, I adore Sussex Pond pudding - and gloucester cheese - in fact there are a whole lot of cheese I forgot all about. When you start looking into food we really are quite lucky with our produce, aren't we? Thanks for the visit.

Beverley said...

Worcestershire Sauce.

JoAnn ( Scene Through My Eyes) said...

I'd say the Seattle area - and onwards up here to where we live (90 miles north) is famous for Ivar's Clam Chowder - rich in cream and diced clams, it is superior to any I've ever tasted. I think the large bowl of it is called a Fish Tank - amusing and delicious.

Bryan Kelly said...

Now I'm seriously considering to go at it easy so that I won't have bad knees like what happened with your husband. When we were young we feel like we could do anything, but it takes a toll that won't manifest until we're old. Nevertheless, you guys seem to have found remedies and it seems to be working, so that should make things easier for you guys.
Bryan Kelly @ CKPhysio.co.uk