Monday, 6 May 2013

Down on the farm.

Friend S, who reads my blog regularly although she doesn't blog for herself, says she enjoys my blog more on the days when I write about what is happening on the farm - so I thought I would bring farm life up to date.

All the sheep have gone back on to the fells and the fields are largely empty except for a small group of dry cows, who are let out every day to enjoy the sunshine and then taken in at night.  While the fields are empty they have all been harrowed, rolled, fertilised with 20:10:10, slurried and now left for the grass to grow (which it is doing with the sunshine we have had over the past few days.)

All the fences damaged by wind or water over the winter months have been repaired and are now in good order, and all the stone walls have also been checked for damage and repaired.

We still have a loose-housing barn full of in- calf cows and they are staying in for a little while longer as they are to be freeze-branded one day next week and it is easier to have them all 'captive' for that operation.   It is not at all painful and every one ends up with a number stamped on its rear end so that it is easily identified.

In a couple of weeks time sheep and lambs will come into the big pasture and heifers for fattening into the other pastures.   Then the rest of the fields will be left to grow until they are ready to be cut for silage.    This operation will be late this year because the weather has been so cold.

Today the catch has broken on the loose-housing door so the farmer is busy welding it together again as I write this.   Once the cows found out that they could push the door open they would be out and away into the fields - they can already smell the grass growing and are getting restless.   

14 comments:

Titus said...

Lovely Weaver, though I am not so fond of the grass growing myself. Titus looks like a wildebeest wandering the veldt already. And the mower always needs sharpening.

Arija said...

There is always something to be done on a farm. Usually something unexpected.
For a couple of weeks during the week I have been alone on the farm, feeding two big lets, two kids, a lamb and five cats, while granddaughter and husband are away shearing. A pity I can't do more than these little tasks but age is creeping up.

Irene said...

You have to be a Jack of all trades on a farm. There can't be any job that you aren't willing or able to tackle. Just like you know how to cook just about any kind of dish on the Aga.

Heather said...

It seems that every living creature wants to be out in the sunshine.
I have enough trouble keeping abreast of all the things I need to do in the garden - I like reading about farm life, but very relieved I don't have to run one!
I hope you have found time to sit in the sun, or shade, this lovely weekend.

Pondside said...

There's always something that needs to be done on a farm - it's a good thing your farmer is man who likes to be busy!

John Gray said...

I loved the last sentence pat......visually feeding

Cloudia said...

Keats, cows, and writing tips!
That's what we lime, you tyro!


Aloha

MorningAJ said...

20:10:10? Sounds very technical. I expect it's something obvious to a farmer, but I have no idea what it is.

angryparsnip said...


Just a lovely post.
After the winter you had I am sure that the cows and sheep just want to be outside and runny around in the warm sun.

cheers, parsnip

JoAnn ( Scene Through My Eyes) said...

Sounds like a wonderful day on the farm - after a long and cold winter.

Crafty Green Poet said...

Nice update! I can imagine the cows becoming very restless with the scent of new grass all aorund!

The Weaver of Grass said...

20:10:10 is n p k = nitrogen, potash and phosphate (the nitrogen being the 20). Thanks for showing an interest.

Kristi in the Western Reserve said...

Dear Weaver, I hope you and your computer are well!

Penny said...

Pat I hope all is well, you havent posted for a while.