Wednesday, 26 September 2012

Aftermath.

The rain has stopped for the moment, after more than five inches.   Already the beck has gone down considerbly although where it runs through our fields it has left its signature all along the banks.   It swept through the wood, carrying with it piles of pine needles; it raged through fencing leaving behind debris in the form of plastic bags, weeds etc; it created several new paths, which may or may not become permanent; if broke down many fences and toppled several walls.   As I write this the farmer is mending a particularly sensitive fence, where some inquisitive beast would be only too pleased to push through, cross the still swollen beck and trample about in the wood given half a chance.

What havoc it has caused everywhere.   Even in our small village quite a few houses have been severely flooded and although the water is receding there are still places on the roads where it is necessary to go really slowly through water still pouring across the road.   And all this water will eventually end up going through York, because it is all making for one or other of our becks and all our becks flow into either the River Ure or the River Swale, and both of those rivers join the River Ouse before it flows through York.  So they will be bracing themselves.  How frightening water can be.

I suppose if we lived in somewhere like Bangladesh, where it regularly floods with the monsoon every year, we would be well used to it and act accordingly.   But sadly we always seem to treat it as though it can't happen here.   And once it has happened then it dominates the conversations of everyone you come across.

The Aga is back up to full power after the farmer took it to pieces and cleaned it.   Because our oil ran low he thinks that the carbon built up and thus inhibited the flame (I don't know what I am talking about here) so that the oven temperature was not high enough to cook anything properly.   Whatever the reason, it is now on full power again and the kitchen is lovely and warm.   And believe me, we need that - it may only be September  but already there is an Autumn chill in the air.   Get your Winter woollies out.

16 comments:

MorningAJ said...

Well I'm glad you're in one piece - even if a bit soggy. Take care and stay dry.

rustyduck said...

Yes, it is turning cold.

The water pouring off the fields is quite amazing, and it's still raining in the South West although we've not had the same volume as you.

I worry that this change in our climate is taking a stronger hold.

it's me said...

As a resident of Louisiana, I can identify with the aftermath of great storms. Water is a powerful force and can do surprising damage in a short time.

I am happy to read that you survived intact. It's been a strange year for weather extremes.

Elizabeth said...

Glad to get your update.
Good news about the Aga. (I always dreamed of having one!)

Heather said...

So pleased that at least your home is high and dry, and warm. My poor tutor has mopping up to do after her cottage was flooded the other day. We have since had very heavy and prolonged showers so I daresay Somerset has had more rain too. It has been slightly warmer today but I wonder what this winter will bring.

Pamela Terry and Edward said...

That much rain begins to grind on the spirit, I have no doubt. Here's to drier, sunnier autumn days from here on out. And to answer your question... YES! I LOVED The Snow Child. Wasn't it lovely?! So happy you read it, too! xo, p

Gwil W said...


I hope it has now stopped raining.

It amazes me how many modern houses and out of town shopping estates are being built on ancient flood plains. I suppose the land there is cheaper. But in the long run it won't be.



Em Parkinson said...

Today is the first day I've felt that chill too. I really appreciate the fact that we're so high here and the huge amounts of rainwater run off the moor down into the valleys. Water is indeed a terrifying thing.

Gerry Snape said...

so glad that the rain has stopped Pat...let's hope and pray that that might be the end of the worst at least....I like your style over the "Techie" dismantling of the Aga....I'm like that ..I'll say ,"We" when I really mean ...Alan

Cloudia said...

running water can still get me worried. 20 years living aboard was enough! I love being many stories high!



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John "By Stargoose And Hanglands" said...

I've been wondering how you were doing with all the rain; we've had nothing approaching that amount of water. Hope the weather is settling down again now. Take care.

Mo and Steve said...

Hope you and yours are all safe and dry.

The Weaver of Grass said...

All back to near normal (whatever that is) - thank for all your concern. Call again.

Dartford Warbler said...

A relief to know that the water has run past you, but not so good for your poor neighbours who have been flooded. I too was watching the River Ouse at York on the news yesterday. Not a happy place to be today.

The water runs downhill past us, either along the lane or through the fields.

Pondside said...

I'm so sorry to hear about all the damage caused by the water. The gentle little streams turn into raging rivers given half a chance, and then you have to deal with the aftermath. Thinking of all of you over there....

Crafty Green Poet said...

You've had it worse than us! It's been bad enough here though, Tuesday was particularly wild, windy and wet. Then yesterday as I walked along the Water of Leith, I'd never seen the river so high before.