Thursday, 17 November 2011

Muntjac


Yesterday I went to Ripon for my hair appointment. Coming back down our lane at lunch time, suddenly a muntjac loped across the road in front of me. It came out of a piece of scrub land, crossed the lane and went into the field on the other side. I didn't stop to get a good look at it. I was quite a few yards further on before I realised what I had seen (it is not uncommon to see roedeer) and by then it was too late, there was no sight of it.

I am absolutely sure it was a muntjac - although it is the first I have seen in the wild. It was smaller than the roe deer, a different colour and - most importantly - its front end was lower than its back end -i.e. it did not have the straight back of a roedeer. We do get roe deer in our fields quite often but this was something quite different.

Quite an exciting end to my morning out I would say.

22 comments:

Tom Stephenson said...

They're becoming more common, Weaver - I have had them almost walk up to me near my workshop. The other really startling thing about these little deer is the tusks - the males (I suppose) have extremely sharp lower tusks which make them look like those Victorian taxidermist's composite make-believe animals, or Noserferatu.

Arija said...

What an exciting sighting Pat.

I'll come back when I have recovered after just having a molar and wisdom tooth out. Not the greatest of pleasures . . .

Elisabeth said...

It sounds almost prehistoric, Pat. What a wonderful sight.

Tanya @ Lovely Greens said...

What a beautiful and exotic looking creature!

Toffeeapple said...

They are a nuisance here, they eat everything from our gardens. I believe they originally escaped from Woburn Safari Park (near to where I live) and are making their way all over the country.

rkbsnana said...

Goodness, I've never heard of them.

Rachel Fox said...

I've never heard of muntjacs!

Learned something today then...
x

John Gray said...

I have never seen one.. do we have them in wales?
I will google it right now!

Dave King said...

How fab'! I haven't seen a muntjac for years, now, but they are fascinating creatures.

steven said...

weaver this is new to me. i remember walking the pennine way and being told in all seriousness that it was not unlikely to see wallabies as some had escaped years ago from a zoo and they had managed to survive on the moors!!! steven

George said...

The is wild! The first time I have ever heard of or seen a muntjac.

MorningAJ said...

There are loads of them around where I used to live on the edge of Warwickshire and they're a bit daft when it comes to crossing roads so they were often available as roadkill.

Is it awful of me to say that there's good eating on one of them - and that it's the nicest venison I've ever tasted.

Pomona said...

Yes indeed - how exciting! I saw a weasel in the garden yesterday, but that doesn't quite match up - or was it a stoat - I always get them mixed up!

Pomona x

Pondside said...

That must have been exciting. I've never heard of this animal - like something from a fairy tale.

angryparsnip said...

It always amazes me that here we are living in a modern world but yet there is a whole second world of wildlife who live among us.
I feel so lucky every time I look out my studio window and am surprised by what happens to be there.
How wonderful that you were able to see a Muntjac.

cheers, parsnip

Rachel said...

It would not be a surprise down here to see a muntjac. We are over-run with them and they are a pest to farmers. We go for natural wastage as they cross the roads to thin them down a bit. You can have them all up in Yorkshire with pleasure. I am surprised your car wasn't surrounded by them when you were on holiday this way earlier in the year!

Heather said...

What a treat to see a wild deer Pat. Muntjac are very sweet but I think the roe deer are more beautiful.

jill said...

Hi,I have just found your blog through my very good friend Mrs Denise Nesbbit.We see a lot of deer around the village where I live but I dont think Iv seen a Muntjac, will have to keep my eyes open.Jill x

The Weaver of Grass said...

Oh dear - those of you who live in a muntjac area are obviously totally fed up with the things - AJ even eats them!! Well I must say it was my first, so it excited me - maybe if there are a lot and they start doing damage I may change my mind. Thank you for the comments.

Titus said...

Well, I'm a wow to the muntjac and to that maple!

Library Diva said...

I am American and never even heard of a muntjac before, so I find this quite exciting!

On a separate note, I really love the peaceful feel of your blog. I am fond of James Herriot's works about being a veterinarian in your part of England, and your blog makes me want to dig them out and re-read them!

the cuby poet said...

I saw the name of your blog which attracted me as their is a song of the same name sung by Skye man Donnie Munro with a rather touching story to go with it. I also see that you write poetry so do I. Leyburn reminds me of a wonderful curd tart I bought there once| The muntjac deer what a lovely unexpected treat. Back very soon. I will sign up to be a follower.