Saturday, 19 November 2011

Christmas begins.


I have never understood why people buy their ready-made Christmas Puddings. They are so easy to make (thanks to Saint Delia), take no time at all and fill the house with the spicy smells of Christmas. A mixture of cinnamon, nutmeg, rum, stout, barley wine, oranges and lemons sneaks into every corner of every room, so that you suddenly catch a whiff unawares.

I suppose having an Aga makes the cooking easy though - they just go in overnight tomorrow night in the bottom oven and cook away all night. When I think back to my childhood, the kitchen used to be full of steam as each pudding had its ten hour steaming - so perhaps that is why people buy rather than make!

Another lovely day here after a foggy start, but now - at 4pm - the cold is coming down and the fog closing in again. I have just lit the stove and the hearth is piled with sweet smelling logs - so that is another smell to tickle the senses and spread the message that Christmas is coming.

Tomorrow anyone who calls will stir the pudding mixture for good luck - because tomorrow is Stir-Up Sunday. All have a metaphorical stir please - it will bring you good luck for the whole year I hope.

21 comments:

Heather said...

I will be with you in spirit tomorrow to stir your pudding Pat. I used to love making Christmas puddings when all the children were still at home but now we are down to two on Christmas Day it seems hardly worth making a tiny one. When we lived in Devon for a short time I had an Aga - it took me a while to make friends with it but I do miss it.
I love the smell of log fires - your house must smell wonderful. Pity you can't bottle it!
Thankyou for your lovely comment.

It's me. said...

I love learning of your holiday customs--I've never made a Christmas pudding, but have tried fruit cakes a few times. Cold weather and puddings do make it seem like Christmas though here in Lousiana the temps are in the 80's and the leaves are still on the trees. A drought continues.

Pamela Terry and Edward said...

Me, too!
Me, too!

Elizabeth said...

"Stir up, we beseech thee the hearts of thy faithful....."
now I will have to look it up in order to continue......
Wonderful smells, yes but not my favorite thing to eat.
Too much booze and dried fruit.

Give it a stir from me!

Pondside said...

I'd love to share in a cyber stir. My mum won't be sending me either pudding or cake this year, but I know she's making small ones for herself and dad and will have everyone stirring the pudding this weekend.

Elizabeth said...

Here it is!

Stir up, we beseech thee, O Lord, the wills of thy faithful people; that they, plenteously bringing forth the fruit of good works, may of thee be plenteously rewarded; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

MorningAJ said...

My mum always made her own puddings but there's only two of us and it isn't worth making one small enough for the amount we want.

angryparsnip said...

I will be siring your pudding in spirit.
I have only bought a Christmas pudding, I heard you steamed them but cooking it all night in the oven is really so different. Is there a water bath included ?
Between your Aga and mrsnesbitt's Rayburn, I don't understand UK ovens at all but they sound pretty great.

Christmas is right around the corner, how did that happened ?

cheers, parsnip

The Solitary Walker said...

Aaargh! Christmas? Is this upon us already, Pat? Think we're behind here...

Cloudia said...

And best wishes to YOU ,friend


Aloha from Honolulu

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rkbsnana said...

I fear I must read up on Christmas puddings. Something you stir for days? Interesting. I do love the smell of log fires too.

Titus said...

You're putting me to shame Weaver! Luckily, Mum still makes kzillions (a steamer, always) so all I have to do is steam again and return the bowls! Well done, and we'll metaphorically stir with you.

Hildred and Charles said...

You inspire me, Pat, to the point where I looked up Delia's luscious recipe, - I would make it just for the hard sauce, which was always the big drawing card when the children were still at home.

Bovey Belle said...

I used to make a couple when mum was alive - one for us to share (no-one else likes them - OH says they're "fattening"!!! This is the man who is 10 stone soaking wet . . .) Now mum's gone, I miss making one (and eating it) but an indulgence really and I could definitely do without the "fattening" element of scoffing a whole one single-handed!

I shall have a metaphorical stir of yours though.

Bovey Belle said...

P.S. I do always make my own mincemeat though - start it in August and let it mature in a big old earthenware jar. It is DIVINE.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Thanks for the metaphorical stirs everyone. Thanks to Elizabeth too for that prayer - most interesting.

Reader Wil said...

We have no X-mas puddings, more is the pity, but we have so many feasts to celebrate in December. Apart from my birthday on the 4th, we have Saint Nicholas on the 5th and Christmas on the 25th and 26th, and then at last New Year's Eve on the 31st of December. Too much to celebrate.

jill said...

Oh I can smell your pudding and logs burning from here,I love the smell of christmas cooking all the spices and fruit lovely.Love Jill xx

Tess Kincaid said...

I want to taste one of yours, Pat!

Robin Mac said...

I'm stirring too for you. I love my Christmas pudding, but I only make it a day or so before Christmas so it can't go mouldy (easy to do in our tropical climate). Mine has to be boilded though. Now I cheat and reheat in the microwave on Christmas Day! Hard sauce to go with it of course. My cake will be cooked tomorrow, fruit soaking now. Cheers.

the cuby poet said...

I can smell your pudding here in Cornwall!
Mmmmmmm................ Lovely.