Monday, 17 January 2011

A Wet Walk





Yesterday was a very wet day. Following on Saturday, which was also wet, there was a lot of flooding further up the Dale where the River Ure had burst its banks in many places and many of the feeder becks were running across the road. But to avoid suffering from cabin fever, we decided to go for a drive and a short walk after lunch yesterday. And Swaledale seemed the better option in view of the floods.

We went the four miles or so to our nearest grouse moors. I must say that the colour of the grass and of the dead bracken and heather was exquisite. Of the grouse there was no sign, although we heard a few calling. They can't be shot, of course, until the "Glorious Twelfth" (Glorious for whom I ask?) of August but their habitat, which is mainly heather moor is annually subject to controlled burning to rejuvenate the heather. Of course, no burning was taking place yesterday but as this week is destined to be dry I expect to see the tell-tale smoke rising from various places on the horizon.

We walked as far as the old lead mine workings, Tess enjoying a whole new range of smells and the farmer and I enjoying the fresh air and the light rain falling.

Then we drove on to Reeth, the only 'town' in Swaledale and pulled into a space at the top of the hill intending to sit there and enjoy the view - but then it really did pour with rain and we decided we ought to beat a hasty retreat and return home in case the River Swale flooded too.

The river was "banking" to use the farmer's expression, but had not flooded any of the fields. He managed to pull into a layby so that I could take a shot of Marrick Priory and its surrounding farm, with the river in the foreground. Then a little further on I snapped Marske bridge where the river was really swirling underneath. What power there is in water.

We came home, lit the stove and settled down to watch the snooker final where two Chinese young men, Ding and Fu, battled it out for the title with some really brilliant playing. We felt much better for having our little sortie out despite the weather, and I am sure that Tess did too.

today's aros: water - its mighty power inspires awe.

18 comments:

Heather said...

Your little jaunt sounds very pleasant inspite of the awful weather. We had a lovely picnic many years ago, eaten in the car as the rain was hammering down. Do hope there is not much flood damage - the power of water can be quite frightening. I love those old stone barns and hope the grouse have a happy life before August!

Elizabeth said...

Thank you for the lovely walk.
Too miserably cold here to do more than stagger round the block with face covered by scarf.
Someone in elevator to me:
You look as if you are wearing a burqua!

Hm........

Tess Kincaid said...

I know I've told you this before, but your neck of the woods takes me back to reading the James Herriot stories to my children. So lovely.

Reader Wil said...

Thanks for this tour! Long agao in the dim and distant past I sent you a comment, saying that you write in such a way, that we really imagine us walking beside you.Therefore it's a pleasure to read your accounts of the surroundings.

Crafty Green Poet said...

it's always nice to get out, even in bad weather, hope the floods subside soon

the weather in Edinburgh is lovely at the moment

Gwilym Williams said...

It's great that your farmer drives you to such scenic locations for you to take your photos. It's a team effort.

Did you see today on Yahoo about the possibility of a super storm in California? Worth a read.

Penny said...

Nice to walk in rain and your photos are lovely.

George said...

Such a nice posting, Pat, especially for me, since many of the places you mention were on my coast to coast walking route. I spent the night in Reeth, walked past the Marrick Priory, and loved everything about Swaledale and the River Swale.

Dartford Warbler said...

I do agree about the beauty of moorland colours in the winter. The richness of heather, bracken, gorse and wet silver birch.

A good walk is the best remedy for cabin fever.

ChrisJ said...

Such beautiful countryside. I love to visit blogs like yours where the owner takes us for walks. When we lived in the Peak District I would regularly go out for a walk in the summer rain, pushing my two year old in his stroller before me.

Jules said...

Wonderful photos, Weaver. Your narrative is so descriptive, I felt like I'd been (and I'm always up for a walk).
I'm enjoying your small stones too :D

Loren said...

Funny how similar the weather have a world away is to your weather.

Walking in the rain is often my favorite time because I often have the nearby park to myself. It's a good thing I enjoy it, too, because the dog and I would really get out of shape if we didn't walk during the rain.

angryparsnip said...

A wet walk but what a beautiful one !
Thank you for the lovely walk in photos.
It has/is been in the high 70's most of last week and this week. our cooler weather comes on Thursday. We are hoping for rain !

cheers, parsnip

Jo said...

I would love for you to post photos from the exact same spots come summertime, Weaver, and see the contrast! I have a friend with a twin in North Tamerton, and have been receiving regular updates on all the horrid weather this winter. Stay safe, and I hope you have many more lovely walk ahead of you!

Bovey Belle said...

Sometimes - despite the weather - a foray outdoors is needed and what a change it makes to get away from the well-trodden local paths. We once had an overnight B&B stay in Reeth, when the girls were 3 1/2 and 18mths . . . what a long time ago now!

Caroline Gill said...

I always enjoy hearing about Reeth - i have only been there once (to my knowledge), and was so taken with the museum.

Golden West said...

Your countryside is lovely, rain or shine!

jeannette said...

the colors and mood, especially in your first and last pics are unrivaled! Sigh, I understand why you choose country over city!