Wednesday, 11 March 2009

Messing about with bits and pieces!


When I had gathered together a box full of bits - tulle, bubble plastic, silver thread, chiffon etc., all in shades of blue and brown, I decided to have a go at replicating a beck in the dales, as it runs over rocks.

The technique I used was to layer the fabrics, sew them down and then burn them back with a heat tool. When I had the effect I wanted, I oversewed and then touched up here and there with Treasure Gold to try and get the effect of the sun through the trees.

I am not sure how good the photograph has reproduced the effect I got - but thought it was time I put a piece of my textile art on my blog.

32 comments:

Derrick said...

Hello Weaver,

I'd say you've got a very good effect indeed! I think the piece is great. I always love blues and so am half way "hooked" at the start! It is also very well framed. You are most talented.

I'm intrigued by your "burning back" ! and where does the bubble plastic come in?

jinksy said...

When the tiny picture appeared on my Blogger Buzz list just now, I thought I was looking at a beautiful painting. Now I'm twice as impressed, to discover it's all textile...

Debra (a/k/a Doris, Mimi) said...

Wow! I am unfamiliar with the techniques you described, but I love the finished piece. It's difficult to believe it isn't an oil painting, the detail is lovely. Yes, I believe you captured the light perfectly. What do you do with your finished work? Do you keep a private collection? Do you sell your work locally? Do you have an Etsy shop?

Gwen Buchanan said...

Weaver, I'm really glad you did!! I love the description of your technique and especially the use of bits and pieces... molding and shaping.. this is gorgeous!! Thanks!

Mary said...

How beautiful! It looks like an Impressionist painting. I've never seen anything quite like it, but I love the fact that you used "recycled" material to make it.

The-Grizzled-But-Still-Incorrigible-Scribe-Himself! said...

That is such a wonderful piece! I love the colors and the technique. So vibrant! Of course, as an old riverman, you had me hooked the moment you decided on depicting your beck, for I've never met a stream—large or small—I didn't like, regardless of form.

I'd love to see your interpretation of my own "home" stream.

Elizabeth said...

Such wonderful colors.....and a most refreshing new way to look at fabric

Brenda said...

My first time to visit you here. I love the techniques you described to create this beautiful piece. I need to go back now and read some more of your posts. They look very interesting especially the maternity ward.

Cathy said...

It's lovely. I've never heard of the burning technique. I thought it was a painting as well at first sight. Amazing.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Derrick - bubble-wrap plastic, I mean - one often gets parcels which use it.
Burning back involves sewing transparent and glittery materials on to a background and then attacking them with a heat gun (like a hair dryer but fiercer) until they begin to come into holes.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Thanks Jinksy.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Debra - all my work is hanging on one wall on my staircase. Every time I finish a piece my husband says "another nail in the wall."

The Weaver of Grass said...

Thank you to Gwen and Mary.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Thanks Scribe. I have a theory (would like to make a post on it but am still thinking it out) that those of us who were born near rivers are somehow different - the river is somehow in our blood. I was born very close to the River Witham in Lincolnshire, which flows into the North Sea at The Wash.

Hildred and Charles said...

Absolutely gorgeous as I look through squinty eyes, and I am intrigued with the burning back technique.

Your stair wall must be beautiful Weaver, and inspire lingering on the treads.

Pat Posner said...

That's gorgeous, Weaver!
I'd love to see your stair wall. How about a photo of it?
Pretty please?

xxPat

Mistlethrush said...

Beautiful textile piece!

Glad you explained 'burning back' as I'd no idea what you meant. It's tempting me to have a go myself.

Did you use a sewing machine to sew everything together first? Or is it a case of just tacking it together and then over-stitching after?

So what else do you have on your stairways...?

The Weaver of Grass said...

Pat I might just put a photo on - I will see what it comes out like tomorrow when the sun is shining in.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Carol - fasten the material together how you like - tack, machine, spray textile glue. Fine fabrics (chiffon, georgette etc) and metallic ones layered over a piece in a deep colour mean that when you burn back the deep colour shows through. The heat tool is rather like a hair dryer but much moe concentrated - not expensive. I incorporated bubble wrap - if you lay a piece of paper over it and then press it with a hot iron the bubbles burst and it gets a texture. Sweet papers often look good incorporated too. Good luck - have a go.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Hildres - the squinty eye technique is a good one - I always do that - also it is good to look through the mirror, one gets a completely different idea of what it is like.

acornmoon said...

Well done you! It looks great. I can see your work adorning hand made books, it looks very tactile to me.

Crafty Green Poet said...

this looks gorgeous, lovely colours and textures, interesting ideas in there too

Heather said...

This is beautiful Weaver, I'm so glad you posted it. I am the greedy sort and want more please, and I'm going back for another viewing.

Pam said...

Now you have be intruiged about the bubble wrap - and your stair wall too! Lovely to see textiles that are a different colour to those I usually work with - delightful to find your piece here...bubble wrap and heat gun will be the next thing on my shopping list - bet you'll have me addicted in no time!

Pamela Terry and Edward said...

I am so glad you shared a piece of your wonderful work! It's beautiful. Really. I wonder, do you ever quilt? I should think you would be a natural at designing your own.

Raph G. Neckmann said...

How beautiful, Weaver! I love the colours and textures, and the swishing rhythm.

I'm glad you explained the burning back technique in your comment back to Derrick - it sounds fascinating. I love techniques where you're not quite sure what the outcome is going to be - one of the nice things about watercolour washes etc too.

(My favourite use for bubble wrap is to jump up and down on it enjoying the popping sounds!)

Janice Thomson said...

Oh Weaver - this is glorious! I love the textures and colours. I am so glad you posted this and hope to see many more!

BT said...

Well, I have to agree with everyone else. It is really beautiful Weaver and depicts the beck so well. I did some burning at college, it's great fun.
I'd love to see a photo of the stair wall.

Red Clover said...

Ha! That's awesome!

Poet in Residence said...

It's a picture for our times. It's like a view from space. I thought of some place in the Himalayas.
When the sun is shining there's nowhere finer than the Dales. But now I must go for my run in the forest.
By the way, culture is always subject to Zeitgeist. They have lost Mozart, have lost Vivaldi, and have stolen Haydn's head. Envy not.

Mary Sharpe said...

I don't know how well the colours have reproduced on the blog (especially on my screen) but there is an enormous sense of movement.

I'm surprised how blue it seems. I would have expected more greys in Yorkshire!

Mary

Robyn said...

Oh I'm so glad you did! This piece is beautiful, Weaver! I love babbling brooks and rushing streams and you have certainly captured the look and feel.